Robert Morris

Death at Libby Prison

(scroll down for info on Libby Prison and 6th Reg. Cavalry, Penn Vol.)

Robert Morris was born March 1837, the son of  Robert Morris and Caroline Nixon. Robert married Ellen Markoe Wharton January 19, 1860,  just prior to the outbreak of the Civil War. The couple had two daughters:

 A Major in the 6th Regiment of Cavalry, Penn Volunteers. Where he was taken prisoner is unknown but he died in Libby Prison, August 13, 1863.

Descendants of Robert Morris

.. 2 Caroline Nixon Morris 1860 - b: October 13, 1860
...... +Augustus F. Kempton Father: Mother:
.. 2 Marion Wharton Morris 1862 - 1918 b: August 24, 1862 in Philadelphia, PA d: February 27, 1918
...... +Richard Norris Williams 1858 - 1918 b: August 26, 1858 in Philadelphia, PA d: February 27, 1918 m: April 20, 1882 Father: Duane WILLIAMS Mother: Alice NORRIS
....... 3 Richard Norris Williams
....... 3 Alexander Coxe Williams
....... 3 Ellen Markoe Wharton Williams
....... 3 James Carey Coals Williams

Ellen remarried October 22, 1867, George M. Dallas, by whom she had four children.

Descendants of George M. Dallas

.. 2 Edith Wharton Dallas 1868 - b: September 06, 1868
.. 2 Trevanion Borda Dallas 1870 - b: January 23, 1870
...... +Mary Pearsall m: May 04, 1894 Father: Mother:
....... 3 Elizabeth Pearsall Dallas 1895 - b: June 05, 1895
....... 3 Edith Wharton Dallas 1897 - b: March 12, 1897
....... 3 George M. Dallas 1900 - b: May 26, 1900
.. 2 Louise Dallas 1872 - 1873 b: June 1872 d: January 1873
.. 2 George Wharton Dallas 1874 - 1900 b: May 06, 1874 d: January 29, 1900

"Libby Prison," Microsoft(R) Encarta(R) 97 Encyclopedia. (c) 1993-1996 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Libby Prison, Confederate prison at Richmond, Virginia, in a three-story brick warehouse owned by the tobacco company Libby and Son and containing eight rooms, each 31.4 by 12.5 m (103 by 42 ft). The prison, used only for Union officers, opened in 1861. Lack of sanitation and overcrowding caused the death of many prisoners between 1863 and 1864. Because of the high death toll, Libby Prison is generally regarded as second in notoriety only to Andersonville Prison. In 1864 the Union prisoners were moved to Macon, Georgia, and the prison was used for Confederate military criminals. In 1889 the building was moved to Chicago to serve as a war museum.

6th Regiment Cavalry (70th Volunteers) "Rush's Lancers"(from Internet source unknow)

Organized at Philadelphia August to October, 1861. Moved to Washington, D.C., December 10 to December 16, 1861. Attached to Emory's Brigade, Cooke's Cav-Brigade, Cavalry Reserve, Army Potomac, to July, 1862. Cavalry Command, Army Potomac, to April, 1862. Emory's 2nd Brigade, Cavalry Division, Army Potomac, to August, 1862. 3rd Brigade, Pleasanton's Cavalry Division, Army Potomac, to November, 1862. Headquarters Left Grand Division, Army Potomac, to February, 1863. Reserve Brigade, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1863. Reserve Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Army Potomac, to August, 1864. 3rd (Reserve) Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, Cavalry Corps, Army Shenandoah and Army Potomac, to June, 1865.

BACK